Monthly Archives: December 2008

Is that time again

As we wrap up 2008 and kick off 2009, there are trends that started this year and will expand into the next. Some are the result of the current inflation and others are the result of technology development, social issues and concern for the environment. Bellow, you will find blurbs and links to the full articles on the said topics.

Local Sports, Events Help Marketers In Hard Times
Advertising Age
The recession might prove to be a boon for out-of-home media and event marketing–especially for local sports. As cash-strapped consumers hunker down and people increasing maintain friendships virtually on the Internet, they yearn for the community of local events. Less appealing are the big national events that advertisers gravitate toward.

The virtual gathering of people in social networks is only intensifying the need for real community gathering, not supplanting it. “Kids now are able to see the whole world,” he said. “It’s worldwide, but it’s an inch deep. And there’s this pane of glass that separates them from experiencing that entire world.”Read the whole story…


Internet Tops Newspapers As News Source, Still Lags TV

by Erik Sass

The Internet is now the most popular source of news after TV, according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, which released its year-end roundup of news media consumption last week. While TV is still king of the hill, its steady decline in the face of Internet competition bodes ill in the long term. … Read the whole story


WOM: Real People Win Deals, Corporate Blogs Spin Wheels

by Erik Sass

Word-of-mouth marketing remains one of the most effective marketing channels–provided that it’s done well, according to two new studies from DEI Worldwide and Forrester Research. Consumers don’t put much trust in corporate blogs or social network profiles, but will readily listen to people. … Read the whole story


YouTube still towers above MySpace, Hulu for online video
YouTube, with nearly 5.6 billion streams to some 85 million unique visitors, was the No. 1 destination for online video viewers in November, according to Nielsen research. YouTube was followed by MySpace, with 244 million streams to 20 million unique visitors, and Hulu, with 221 million streams to about 7.5 million unique visitors. TVWeek.com (12/29)

JWT futurist eyes brand trends for 2009
While corporate budgets and consumer belts are tightening, marketing and media companies that seize on certain social and entertainment trends will successfully ride out the new year, according to Ann Mack, director of trendspotting for ad agency JWT. Among the hot-button trends for 2009 are environmental responsibility, brand authenticity and content mobility. MediaPost Communications (12/29)

Do the Right Thing
10 Rules for Leading Ethically

It’s been all too easy to criticize the unethical behaviors of business and political leaders these days. But if your company isn’t among those generating scandal and scorn, consider yourself warned. CCL’s Cresencio Torres reminds us that lapses in ethical judgment occur every day in our organizations and, likely, in our private lives.

“Ethical leadership isn’t about avoiding the worst behaviors. It isn’t about technically following laws and regulations,” says Torres. “Ethics determines fair and honest behavior and establishes boundaries about how we relate to each other. In that sense, the only way for people to work well together, and to have good professional and personal relationships, is to think and act in an ethical way.”

To reclaim ethical leadership for yourself and your organization, Torres offers these 10 Rules for Ethical Leadership here:

http://www.ccl.org/leadership/enewsletter/2008/DECdo.aspx


Is that time again

As we wrap up 2008 and kick off 2009, there are trends that started this year and will expand into the next. Some are the result of the current inflation and others are the result of technology development, social issues and concern for the environment. Bellow, you will find blurbs and links to the full articles on the said topics.

Local Sports, Events Help Marketers In Hard Times
Advertising Age
The recession might prove to be a boon for out-of-home media and event marketing–especially for local sports. As cash-strapped consumers hunker down and people increasing maintain friendships virtually on the Internet, they yearn for the community of local events. Less appealing are the big national events that advertisers gravitate toward.

The virtual gathering of people in social networks is only intensifying the need for real community gathering, not supplanting it. “Kids now are able to see the whole world,” he said. “It’s worldwide, but it’s an inch deep. And there’s this pane of glass that separates them from experiencing that entire world.”Read the whole story…

Internet Tops Newspapers As News Source, Still Lags TV

by Erik Sass

The Internet is now the most popular source of news after TV, according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, which released its year-end roundup of news media consumption last week. While TV is still king of the hill, its steady decline in the face of Internet competition bodes ill in the long term. … Read the whole story

WOM: Real People Win Deals, Corporate Blogs Spin Wheels

by Erik Sass

Word-of-mouth marketing remains one of the most effective marketing channels–provided that it’s done well, according to two new studies from DEI Worldwide and Forrester Research. Consumers don’t put much trust in corporate blogs or social network profiles, but will readily listen to people. … Read the whole story

YouTube still towers above MySpace, Hulu for online video
YouTube, with nearly 5.6 billion streams to some 85 million unique visitors, was the No. 1 destination for online video viewers in November, according to Nielsen research. YouTube was followed by MySpace, with 244 million streams to 20 million unique visitors, and Hulu, with 221 million streams to about 7.5 million unique visitors. TVWeek.com (12/29)

JWT futurist eyes brand trends for 2009
While corporate budgets and consumer belts are tightening, marketing and media companies that seize on certain social and entertainment trends will successfully ride out the new year, according to Ann Mack, director of trendspotting for ad agency JWT. Among the hot-button trends for 2009 are environmental responsibility, brand authenticity and content mobility. MediaPost Communications (12/29)

Do the Right Thing
10 Rules for Leading Ethically

It’s been all too easy to criticize the unethical behaviors of business and political leaders these days. But if your company isn’t among those generating scandal and scorn, consider yourself warned. CCL’s Cresencio Torres reminds us that lapses in ethical judgment occur every day in our organizations and, likely, in our private lives.  “Ethical leadership isn’t about avoiding the worst behaviors. It isn’t about technically following laws and regulations,” says Torres. “Ethics determines fair and honest behavior and establishes boundaries about how we relate to each other. In that sense, the only way for people to work well together, and to have good professional and personal relationships, is to think and act in an ethical way.” To reclaim ethical leadership for yourself and your organization, Torres offers these 10 Rules for Ethical Leadership here:http://www.ccl.org/leadership/enewsletter/2008/DECdo.aspx


Is that time again

As we wrap up 2008 and kick off 2009, there are trends that started this year and will expand into the next. Some are the result of the current inflation and others are the result of technology development, social issues and concern for the environment. Bellow, you will find blurbs and links to the full articles on the said topics.

Local Sports, Events Help Marketers In Hard Times
Advertising Age
The recession might prove to be a boon for out-of-home media and event marketing–especially for local sports. As cash-strapped consumers hunker down and people increasing maintain friendships virtually on the Internet, they yearn for the community of local events. Less appealing are the big national events that advertisers gravitate toward.

The virtual gathering of people in social networks is only intensifying the need for real community gathering, not supplanting it. “Kids now are able to see the whole world,” he said. “It’s worldwide, but it’s an inch deep. And there’s this pane of glass that separates them from experiencing that entire world.”Read the whole story…


Internet Tops Newspapers As News Source, Still Lags TV

by Erik Sass

The Internet is now the most popular source of news after TV, according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, which released its year-end roundup of news media consumption last week. While TV is still king of the hill, its steady decline in the face of Internet competition bodes ill in the long term. … Read the whole story


WOM: Real People Win Deals, Corporate Blogs Spin Wheels

by Erik Sass

Word-of-mouth marketing remains one of the most effective marketing channels–provided that it’s done well, according to two new studies from DEI Worldwide and Forrester Research. Consumers don’t put much trust in corporate blogs or social network profiles, but will readily listen to people. … Read the whole story


YouTube still towers above MySpace, Hulu for online video
YouTube, with nearly 5.6 billion streams to some 85 million unique visitors, was the No. 1 destination for online video viewers in November, according to Nielsen research. YouTube was followed by MySpace, with 244 million streams to 20 million unique visitors, and Hulu, with 221 million streams to about 7.5 million unique visitors. TVWeek.com (12/29)

JWT futurist eyes brand trends for 2009
While corporate budgets and consumer belts are tightening, marketing and media companies that seize on certain social and entertainment trends will successfully ride out the new year, according to Ann Mack, director of trendspotting for ad agency JWT. Among the hot-button trends for 2009 are environmental responsibility, brand authenticity and content mobility. MediaPost Communications (12/29)

Do the Right Thing
10 Rules for Leading Ethically

It’s been all too easy to criticize the unethical behaviors of business and political leaders these days. But if your company isn’t among those generating scandal and scorn, consider yourself warned. CCL’s Cresencio Torres reminds us that lapses in ethical judgment occur every day in our organizations and, likely, in our private lives.

“Ethical leadership isn’t about avoiding the worst behaviors. It isn’t about technically following laws and regulations,” says Torres. “Ethics determines fair and honest behavior and establishes boundaries about how we relate to each other. In that sense, the only way for people to work well together, and to have good professional and personal relationships, is to think and act in an ethical way.”

To reclaim ethical leadership for yourself and your organization, Torres offers these 10 Rules for Ethical Leadership here:

http://www.ccl.org/leadership/enewsletter/2008/DECdo.aspx


Online Marketers Wooing Minorities More

In the last couple of weeks I have received a lot of feedback from executives at corporate America asking me for feedback and ideas for 2009. This article from BusinessWeek is a good lead to follow: Link to Article

Online Marketers Wooing Minorities More
As Internet use among Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans rises, advertisers are beginning to take notice

By Douglas MacMillan
Technology

Even as companies rein in marketing spending during a sinking economy, many advertisers are likely to step up efforts to reach minorities online in the coming months, researchers say. Amid increases in the numbers of Hispanics, African Americans, and Asian Americans online, marketers are adapting campaigns to court these markets, online advertising researcher eMarketer said in a Dec. 17 report.

Of marketers that target minority groups, 95% tailor messages to Latin Americans, 76% target African Americans, and 38% focus on Asian Americans, according to a survey released in November by the trade group Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and marketing agency Mkgt. That’s up from 86%, 60%, and 35%, respectively, in 2003, according to the research.

The numbers reflect increased use of the Internet by nonwhite segments of the population and the importance of making marketing messages culturally relevant to potential new customers, eMarketer says. According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 70% of African Americans are now online, making them the fastest-growing population of Internet users since 2003, when only a little more than half were online. Hispanics are second-fastest-growing and now boast a 79% penetration rate—higher than any other group. By comparison, three-fourths of non-Hispanic whites are online, up from 64% three years ago.
Multicultural Marketing

To be effective, advertisers “can’t just translate their mass-market campaign into another language,” says eMarketer senior analyst Lisa Phillips. “You have to have an understanding of their cultures and traditions.” That approach has worked for Microsoft (MSFT). For a recent ad campaign for Windows Vista, the company noticed that Hispanics were responding particularly well to the product’s parental-control features. So it rejiggered the online display ads to emphasize those features for Hispanic audiences.

Online, it’s easier to measure which campaigns work with different ethnic groups, says Microsoft’s director of multicultural marketing Jose Piñero. The Redmond (Wash.) software maker introduces diversity elements in its marketing one product group at a time. In 2003 only its Xbox, search, and retail teams had started multicultural components. Now it has 20 groups that do. The company expects that number to grow in 2009. “As more product groups begin to do multicultural marketing, online is a popular medium because it’s so easy to track” what types of consumers they reach, Piñero says.

Some marketers have found that cultural niches tend already to have formed close-knit communities online, and they see this as an opportunity for their message to spread virally. That was the case with Toyota Motor (TM), which saw a blossoming Asian American film community online as a good target for its Matrix car. The company hired InterTrend Communications, an ad agency that specializes in the Asian American audience, to create a marketing mini-site online called “The Director’s Chair,” where it compiled exclusive video interviews with popular Asian American directors and actors, such as Harold and Kumar’s John Cho. “Asian Americans tend to be technologically savvy and rely heavily on the Internet as a means of staying connected to friends [and] family, and for sources of information,” says Carolyn Yian, InterTrend’s associate director for consumer insights.
First-Mover Advantage

Agencies like InterTrend that specialize in multicultural marketing are projecting demand at least to hold steady for the next year—a promising sign in the current economic climate. “I can safely say that we’ll be where we were in 2008,” says Ken Cervantes, vice-president and activation director for Forty Two Degrees, the multicultural unit of Publicis-owned (PUB) Starcom MediaVest Group. “If anything, what you’re probably looking at is a slight relocation of ad dollars to extend things we are doing on television into digital.”

Some new categories of advertisers are looking to compete in a cultural segment where they never have before. When that happens, the advantage goes to the first-mover, says John Nash, president of Moon City Productions, a New York-based ad agency that caters to gay and lesbian markets. For example, Nash says vodka makers like Sky and Smirnoff have recently tried to court gay and lesbian consumers without as much success as Absolut, a Moon City client that has marketed toward this segment for decades.

While it’s necessary for advertising to reflect cultures and attitudes of its intended audience, the importance of translating language should not be overlooked. In November, Home Depot (HD) became the first home improvement retailer to set up a full-function e-commerce site entirely in Spanish. Says Jean Niemi, a spokesperson for the company: “One of the things we realized was that home improvement for anyone in general can be difficult, so for Hispanics to go on and not do it in their own language it can be [especially] intimidating.”


14 Big Businesses That Started in a Recession

I found this article that highlights how opportunity is everywhere and you just need to look at the glass half full.

Thought you couldn’t start a company during a recession? These enterprises made it big by doing just that.

By Sarah Caron | November 11, 2008



http://www.insidecrm.com/features/businesses-started-slump-111108/

It might seem counterintuitive to start a new business when the economy is in the dumps. But a recession can actually be the ideal time for launching a company. In fact, many well-known and successful organizations were born during an economic slump.

Why do these companies succeed? Usually it’s because the founders recognized a market need and filled it. Identifying that need — whether it’s related to entertainment, travel or even streamlining how businesses operate — is the key to any thriving enterprise, regardless of the economic climate in which it begins. The following major corporations made it big during recessions by doing just that.

Hyatt Corp. opened its first hotel’s doors at the Los Angeles International Airport during the Eisenhower recession (1957 to 1958). The chain rose to worldwide fame in the following decades and now operates more than 365 hotels in 25 countries with premium services such as wifi hotspots.

Burger King Corp., with its flame-broiled burgers, is another recession startup. The company began in 1954 when James McLamore and David Edgerton opened a Burger King restaurant in Miami, Fla. During another recession in 1957, the company introduced its successful signature burger — the Whopper. Today, the company operates more than 11,100 locations in 65 countries.

IHOP Corp. is another star from the Eisenhower recession. The first restaurant in the now national chain opened its doors July1958 in Toluca Lake, Calif. Owners Al and Jerry Lapin were at the helm of the fast growing company, which began franchising just three years later. Today, there are more than 1,300 locations across the U.S.

The Jim Henson Company was created by famed puppeteer Jim Henson in 1958. Henson’s business was responsible for some of the best-known puppet characters of all time including Miss Piggy, Kermit the Frog and Elmo. Today, the privately held company is managed by Henson’s children and continues to thrive by creating popular kids-friendly shows and movies.

LexisNexis is a research hub for the law, media and more. The company, originally a government contractor, began its LexisNexis computerized legal research service during the 1973 oil crisis that rocked the country into steep economic slump. The now Web-based service is used in 100 countries by individuals in law, government, education and business.

FedEx Corp. began operations on April 17, 1973 as Federal Express, a nod to the Federal Reserve, with whom founder Frederick W. Smith had hoped to get a contract. He didn’t, but the company that delivered 186 packages to 25 cities on its first night of operations now manages more than 7.5 million shipments everyday worldwide.

Microsoft Corp. wasn’t always the jaw-dropping enterprise it is today. In 1975, when it was created by Harvard University dropout Bill Gates, Microsoft was just a little company in Albuquerque, N.M. It dealt in rudimentary computing languages and began its climb to business stardom with the success of MS-DOS, which was sold and marketed to IBM Corp. and then-IBM clones. Today, the company is estimated to earn more than $60 billion in revenue per year and is branching into new areas including VoIP and CRM.

CNN might be a news giant now, but in recession-plagued 1980, it was a little-known station called The Cable Network News. It revolutionized how people received information when it premiered as the first 24-hour all-news channel. Today, 1.5 billion people across the globe watch CNN.

MTV Networks brought something new and different to the music scene when it debuted in the economic slump of 1981. Intended to be an all-music-video channel, MTV used VJs (video jockeys) to host programs and facilitate transitions between videos. Today, MTV is a global brand with dozens of shows, music-related and not.

Trader Joe’s started as a chain of convenience stores called Pronto Markets in the slow financial times of 1958. In 1967, the company changed its name to Trader Joe’s and began to carry unique grocery items under its own brand. The company now operates more than 280 stores in the U.S.

Wikipedia Foundation Inc. was born during the recent post-9/11 recession. Established in January 2001, the online encyclopedia had more than 100,000 entries by 2003. Today it is home to more than 2.5 million articles and continues to grow.

Sports Illustrated magazine was launched on August 16, 1954, at the tail-end of a recession. The magazine benefitted from fortunate timing as a boom in professional sports exploded soon after its founding. Sports Illustrated now sells about 3 million copies in the U.S. each week.

GE (General Electric Co.) was established in 1876 by famed American inventor Thomas Edison. In the middle of the Panic of 1873, a six-year recession, Edison created one of the best-known inventions of all time — the incandescent light bulb. In terms of market capitalization, GE is now the third largest company in the world. The enterprise has evolved from a manufacturing-strong business to an enterprise earning more than 50 percent of its revenue from its financial services division.

HP (Hewlett-Packard Development Company LP) was inauspiciously born in a Palo Alto garage at the end of the Great Depression. The electronic company, initially supported by a mere $538 investment, has grown into the first technology business to exceed $100 billion in revenue, earning $104 billion in 2007. It now operates in nearly every country in the world.

Recessions, however, aren’t advantageous only to start-ups. Pre-existing companies can also make incredible gains in years where the economy is down. Some of the most recent success stories are those of Google, PayPal and Salesforce.com Inc. From 2000 to 2001 each of these companies thrived, leading PayPal to go public in 2002, followed by Google and Salesforce.com in 2004.


14 Big Businesses That Started in a Recession

I found this article that highlights how opportunity is everywhere and you just need to look at the glass half full.

Thought you couldn’t start a company during a recession? These enterprises made it big by doing just that.

By Sarah Caron | November 11, 2008



http://www.insidecrm.com/features/businesses-started-slump-111108/

It might seem counterintuitive to start a new business when the economy is in the dumps. But a recession can actually be the ideal time for launching a company. In fact, many well-known and successful organizations were born during an economic slump.

Why do these companies succeed? Usually it’s because the founders recognized a market need and filled it. Identifying that need — whether it’s related to entertainment, travel or even streamlining how businesses operate — is the key to any thriving enterprise, regardless of the economic climate in which it begins. The following major corporations made it big during recessions by doing just that.

Hyatt Corp. opened its first hotel’s doors at the Los Angeles International Airport during the Eisenhower recession (1957 to 1958). The chain rose to worldwide fame in the following decades and now operates more than 365 hotels in 25 countries with premium services such as wifi hotspots.

Burger King Corp., with its flame-broiled burgers, is another recession startup. The company began in 1954 when James McLamore and David Edgerton opened a Burger King restaurant in Miami, Fla. During another recession in 1957, the company introduced its successful signature burger — the Whopper. Today, the company operates more than 11,100 locations in 65 countries.

IHOP Corp. is another star from the Eisenhower recession. The first restaurant in the now national chain opened its doors July1958 in Toluca Lake, Calif. Owners Al and Jerry Lapin were at the helm of the fast growing company, which began franchising just three years later. Today, there are more than 1,300 locations across the U.S.

The Jim Henson Company was created by famed puppeteer Jim Henson in 1958. Henson’s business was responsible for some of the best-known puppet characters of all time including Miss Piggy, Kermit the Frog and Elmo. Today, the privately held company is managed by Henson’s children and continues to thrive by creating popular kids-friendly shows and movies.

LexisNexis is a research hub for the law, media and more. The company, originally a government contractor, began its LexisNexis computerized legal research service during the 1973 oil crisis that rocked the country into steep economic slump. The now Web-based service is used in 100 countries by individuals in law, government, education and business.

FedEx Corp. began operations on April 17, 1973 as Federal Express, a nod to the Federal Reserve, with whom founder Frederick W. Smith had hoped to get a contract. He didn’t, but the company that delivered 186 packages to 25 cities on its first night of operations now manages more than 7.5 million shipments everyday worldwide.

Microsoft Corp. wasn’t always the jaw-dropping enterprise it is today. In 1975, when it was created by Harvard University dropout Bill Gates, Microsoft was just a little company in Albuquerque, N.M. It dealt in rudimentary computing languages and began its climb to business stardom with the success of MS-DOS, which was sold and marketed to IBM Corp. and then-IBM clones. Today, the company is estimated to earn more than $60 billion in revenue per year and is branching into new areas including VoIP and CRM.

CNN might be a news giant now, but in recession-plagued 1980, it was a little-known station called The Cable Network News. It revolutionized how people received information when it premiered as the first 24-hour all-news channel. Today, 1.5 billion people across the globe watch CNN.

MTV Networks brought something new and different to the music scene when it debuted in the economic slump of 1981. Intended to be an all-music-video channel, MTV used VJs (video jockeys) to host programs and facilitate transitions between videos. Today, MTV is a global brand with dozens of shows, music-related and not.

Trader Joe’s started as a chain of convenience stores called Pronto Markets in the slow financial times of 1958. In 1967, the company changed its name to Trader Joe’s and began to carry unique grocery items under its own brand. The company now operates more than 280 stores in the U.S.

Wikipedia Foundation Inc. was born during the recent post-9/11 recession. Established in January 2001, the online encyclopedia had more than 100,000 entries by 2003. Today it is home to more than 2.5 million articles and continues to grow.

Sports Illustrated magazine was launched on August 16, 1954, at the tail-end of a recession. The magazine benefitted from fortunate timing as a boom in professional sports exploded soon after its founding. Sports Illustrated now sells about 3 million copies in the U.S. each week.

GE (General Electric Co.) was established in 1876 by famed American inventor Thomas Edison. In the middle of the Panic of 1873, a six-year recession, Edison created one of the best-known inventions of all time — the incandescent light bulb. In terms of market capitalization, GE is now the third largest company in the world. The enterprise has evolved from a manufacturing-strong business to an enterprise earning more than 50 percent of its revenue from its financial services division.

HP (Hewlett-Packard Development Company LP) was inauspiciously born in a Palo Alto garage at the end of the Great Depression. The electronic company, initially supported by a mere $538 investment, has grown into the first technology business to exceed $100 billion in revenue, earning $104 billion in 2007. It now operates in nearly every country in the world.

Recessions, however, aren’t advantageous only to start-ups. Pre-existing companies can also make incredible gains in years where the economy is down. Some of the most recent success stories are those of Google, PayPal and Salesforce.com Inc. From 2000 to 2001 each of these companies thrived, leading PayPal to go public in 2002, followed by Google and Salesforce.com in 2004.


%d bloggers like this: